18 Standing Poses Reference: How to Draw the Human Figure in a Standing Position

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Looking for a standing poses reference? Do you want to learn how to draw human figures in a standing position? It can be tricky, but with the right reference material and some practice, you can do it! In this blog post, I will provide you with some photos of standing poses drawing. I will also give you some tips on how to improve your technique. So let’s get started!

Table of Contents

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Standing Poses Reference: A Collection of 18 Images of Standing Poses

All the standing pose photo references I have compiled below come from my Canva Pro account. You can find more standing pose references from unsplash.com.

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Where can I get references for poses?

When beginning to draw the human figure in various poses, one of the best ways to ensure accuracy is to use references. This is especially important with standing poses. But where can you find a good photo to copy?

Here are a few ideas:

  • Look online. A quick Google search will turn up plenty of websites with reference photos. Many of these sites are free to use, but some may require registration or a subscription. I like to use Unsplash or Pexels to source figure drawing reference pictures.
  • Check out art books from your local library. You’ll likely find a variety of titles that include reference photos or illustrations.
  • Use Pinterest. This social media site is chock-full of images, including plenty of reference photos for poses. Just do a search for “figure drawing references” and you’ll have plenty to choose from.
  • Ask friends or family members to pose for you. This is probably the best option, as you can customize the poses to exactly what you need. Just be sure to get their permission first!

How do you draw a person in standing poses?

To draw standing poses, start by sketching a basic skeleton to establish the posture and general proportions of the figure.

female standing poses reference 10
female standing poses reference 10
female standing poses reference 10

Then, add muscle groups and flesh over the skeleton.

male standing figure standing poses reference 2
male standing figure standing poses reference 2
male standing figure standing poses reference 2

Finally, use details such as hair, clothes, and facial features to bring the figure to life.

Female Wonderwoman Standing Pose 1 Standing poses reference
Female Wonderwoman Standing Pose 1 Standing poses reference
Female Wonderwoman Standing Pose 1 Standing poses reference

Start with a light sketch, using pencil to help you get the proportions and posture right.

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standing poses reference
standing poses reference

Once you’re happy with the basic shape of the figure, start to add muscle groups and flesh.

Begin with the larger groups such as the chest and thighs, then add smaller details such as arms and hands.

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female standing poses reference 8

Finally, use fine-line drawing techniques to add features such as facial features, hair, and clothing.

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standing poses reference 4
standing poses reference 4

Remember to keep your lines light and review your drawing until you’re happy with the final result. With a little practice, you’ll be able to draw a variety of standing human figures in no time!

What is a full-body drawing of a person called?

A full-body drawing of a person is called a figure study. Figure studies are traditionally created in pencil or charcoal, and artists often use them as a way to improve their understanding of human anatomy and proportions.

While figure studies can be done from life, they are often done from photographs or other references. This allows the artist to spend more time on their creations and produce more detailed work. Figure studies are also frequently used as preparatory drawings for paintings or sculptures.

In these cases, the artist will often make multiple figure studies in order to experiment with different poses and compositions before settling on a final design. Whatever the purpose, figure studies are an important part of any artist’s practice.

What is human figure drawing called?

If you’re interested in art and you enjoy art museums, you may have noticed that some of the paintings and sculptures feature human figures. This type of art is called figure drawing, and it has been around for centuries.

Artists have long been fascinated by the human form, and figure drawing allows them to capture the beauty and mystery of the human body.

There are many different styles of figure drawing, ranging from realistic to abstract.

Regardless of the style, figure drawings are always based on the same essential principle: studying and observing the human form in order to create a work of art that is both aesthetically pleasing and accurate.

How to Draw from a Reference Picture:

Drawing from a picture is a great way to improve your skills as an artist. However, it can be tricky to get the proportions and details right.

Here are a few tips to help you get the most out of your source images:

  • Choose a well-lit, high-contrast image. This will make it easier to see the details and lines that you need to draw.
  • Use a grid to help you break down the image into manageable pieces. This will make it easier to transfer the image onto your paper or canvas.
  • Start with the major shapes and then fill in the details. Don’t get too caught up in getting everything perfect – just focus on getting the overall proportions right.
  • Take your time and be patient. Drawing is all about practice, so don’t expect to get it perfect on your first try. Just keep working at it and you’ll gradually improve. If you really struggle you can always trace your work. Some believe if you trace your characters it isn’t considered “real” art. But sometimes tracing an artwork will give you a better idea of how to join the different body parts together.

Use a lightbox

Drawing from a reference picture can be tricky- it’s easy to get caught up in trying to copy every detail, rather than using the reference as a guide to creating your own work.

One handy tool for drawing from a reference picture is a lightbox. A lightbox is a thin, translucent surface that emits light from below. This makes it much easier to see the lines and details of a reference picture, without having to hold it up to a light source.

As a result, you can spend more time focusing on your drawing, and less time struggling to see the reference material. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned artist, using a lightbox can help you create better drawings from reference pictures.

Use the grid method

When it comes to drawing, many people find it helpful to use reference pictures. This can be a great way to learn how to draw new subjects or improve your skills.

However, simply copying a reference picture can result in an inaccurate and sloppy final product. A better approach is to use the grid method. This involves drawing a grid on both the reference picture and the paper you are drawing on.

Once you have done this, you can start by drawing one square of the grid at a time, working from left to right and top to bottom.

This will help you to break down the reference picture into manageable pieces and produce a more accurate drawing. 

Sketch your image freehand

If you’re an artist, sooner or later you’ll probably want to know how to draw from a reference picture.

It’s a great way to improve your drawing skills by studying the work of other artists. And it can be especially helpful if you’re trying to capture a specific image or detail.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to drawing from a reference picture:

  1. Choose a reference picture that you want to draw. Try to find an image that is high quality and has good lighting.
  2. Study the reference picture closely. Notice the details and shapes of the subject matter.
  3. Sketch your image freehand on a piece of paper. Use light pencil strokes so you can easily erase or make changes if necessary.
  4. Begin to fill in your drawing with more details and darker lines. Add shading and highlights as desired.
  5. Compare your drawing to the reference picture and make any final adjustments.
  6. It’s a good idea to also have a browse through some literature on drawing. (Check out my review of the best drawing books for artists).
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Conclusion

Use the standing poses reference above to improve your skills as an artist. With a little practice, you’ll be able to create accurate and detailed drawings of human figures in standing positions. Remember you can always use a lightbox or the grid method to help you transfer the image onto your paper, and don’t be afraid to experiment with different shading techniques.

Happy drawing 🙂

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